About

I’m Rob Flickenger.

Some people know me from my books (I once wrote and edited for O’Reilly, I wrote an article for the first issue of Make Magazine, and I’ve had a few successful independent book projects since then.) Back in the heady days of the Bay Area tech boom, I wrote an article about how to make a WiFi antenna out of a Pringles can. It became surprisingly popular.

Those experiences led me to get involved with various community wireless network projects. Those were fun days. But eventually, it seemed to me that the real need for connectivity wasn’t in the cities (or even backroads) of the wealthy west. The developing world needs access to information far more critically than we do.

Lately I spend a lot of time teaching and sharing information about computers and wireless networking. This sort of activity has led me to travel all over the world (though there’s still a lot more to see…)

In my spare time, I’m in the throes of a tawdry love affair with electrical energy. I enjoy making toys that do unusual things with electricity. My experiments often involve a ridiculous amount of energy and some very unusual folks. I also maintain my very own mad scientist’s lair.

The name dɸ/dt (pronounced defy-dee-tee) refers to a change in magnetic flux over a change in time. If the change in flux is large enough (or the time is small enough), all sorts of interesting things start to happen.

The name Hacker Friendly should be self-explanatory. Stuff is made to be used. If your stuff works the way you want to, or if it can be modified so it can be used better, then it is Hacker Friendly.

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